UniServe€Science News: Newsletter of the Science Software Clearinghouse Vol. 2, November 1995

NetBiochem: A Biochemistry Resource for all to use

http://www.hahnemann.edu/Heme-Iron/NetWelcome.html

James Baggott is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at Hahnemann University School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

Sharon E. Dennis is the Head of Computer and Media Services at the Eccles Health Sciences Library of the University of Utah, Salt Lake City

The complete text of this article can be found at http://www.ncsa.uiuc.edu/SDG/IT94/Proceedings/BioChem/baggott/baggott.html/

NetBiochem is a centre for Biochemistry education, communication and research on the World Wide Web. The current prototype version of NetBiochem incorporates representative materials that illustrate our goal of creating a complete resource for these activities.

Education

Two major types of resource are available. The first is an interlinked database of educational material consisting of text, sound, graphics (animated and with sound when appropriate) and self-testing with feedback, covering the complete content of a typical biochemistry course at the medical school level. One module is complete; others are in a text-only stage, and still others are at earlier stages of construction. The other resource is a library of animated and still graphics illustrating biochemical processes and phenomena. Users are invited to download any of this material and modify it as desired for local use, e.g., as visual aids in lectures or as documents on local networks that reflect a different emphasis preferred by local faculty.

Communication

Examples of full papers (augmented with colour graphics and animations) and complete poster sessions (with colour graphics) demonstrate to the Biochemistry community the power if the World Wide Web as a tool for exchanging research information.

Research

Anchors to HTML documents and gopher sites of major interest (databases, grant information, etc.) to biochemistry and molecular biology have been provided. Students experienced with computer based learning have tested the earliest elements of NetBiochem, have judged them satisfactory learning tools, and have made attainable recommendations for improvement.

James Baggott & Sharon E. Dennis
baggottj@hal.hahnemann.edu

Learning materials available at NetBiochem:

  • Heme and Iron Metabolism (complete)

  • Macromolecules (53 K, text only)

  • Membranes (27 K, text and two animations only)

  • Nucleic Acids (26K, text only)

  • Purines and Pyrimidines (complete)

  • (Additional topics are being prepared; an entire course is planned.)

  • Animated and still graphics

NetBiochem is also available at http://www-medlib.med.utah.edu/NetBiochem/NetWelco.htm All files can be downloaded via ftp from ftp://medlib.med.utah.edu/Slice/NetBiochem/ for modification and local use (see copyright agreements).


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